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Our Pain Management Services

Looking for a Thigh Pain Therapist?

Thigh pain physiotherapy targets discomfort originating from the muscles, joints, or tissues in the upper leg. Skilled physiotherapists employ tailored techniques like manual therapy, targeted exercises, and modalities to alleviate pain and enhance mobility. By identifying and addressing the underlying causes, this specialised care aims to improve strength, flexibility, and overall function in the thigh area. Whether due to injury, strain, or chronic conditions, thigh pain physiotherapy plays a crucial role in restoring comfort and mobility for individuals experiencing upper leg discomfort.

PhysioComesToYou offers a flexible approach to our physiotherapy appointments. We understand that attending a clinic can be inconvenient so we offer a mobile service. Our expert physiotherapists can attend at your work, care home, school or home at a time to suit you. We have appointments at the weekend and during the evening so you can be on the road to recovery as soon as possible.

We Specialise in Utilising the following Types of Therapy

Back Pain

Neck Pain

Shoulder Pain

Groin Pain

Foot Pain

Ankle Pain

Elbow Pain

Hip Pain

Thigh Pain

Thigh pain is any type of pain or discomfort affecting the upper half of the lower limb stretching from the pelvis and hip to the knee. The femur is the bone which travels down the whole thigh and is surround by muscles, nerves, soft tissue and blood supply. Ligaments attach the femur bone to the knee, hip and pelvic bones and tendons join the muscles to bone. There are numerous problems that can lead to pain in the thigh and to find out more information about these please click on the area of pain below.

Self diagnosis can lead to wasted time trying to sort without success. This can lead to Chronic Pain. One of our experienced physios can come to you and solve the cause of the pain and fix the problem.

Quadriceps Contusion

The main muscle group at the front of your leg is known as the quadriceps. When these muscles are subjected to a direct impact or trauma, it can result in blood vessel haemorrhage, leading to symptoms such as bruises, swelling, and reduced knee mobility.

The approach to physiotherapy will depend on the severity of the injury. In cases of minor bleeding, physiotherapy can play a crucial role in managing the condition and expediting your recovery. This may involve techniques such as guidance on pain management, massage, compression therapy, ultrasound, and the development of a gradual rehabilitation plan tailored to your needs, with the goal of helping you return to your sports activities. However, in more severe cases, there may be a need for a period of rest and recovery before initiating physiotherapy.

Quadriceps Muscle Strain

The quadriceps muscle group, located in the front of the thigh, consists of three muscles: the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, and vastus lateralis. Strains can affect these muscles to varying degrees, and all three can be susceptible to strains. The severity of a muscular strain can be classified into grades. Grade I strains involve only a small portion of the muscle fibres and result in localised discomfort. Grade II strains are characterised by pain, swelling, reduced strength, and potential limitations in movement due to a more extensive tear of muscle fibres. Grade III strains represent a complete tear of the muscle.

The grade of the strain determines the approach to physiotherapy treatment. Physiotherapists can provide guidance, utilise techniques such as icing, massage, soft tissue methods, stretching, ultrasound therapy, and taping. For safe return to sports activities and to rebuild muscle strength and flexibility, a graduated and progressive training program is recommended.

Sartorius Muscle Strain

The long and slender Sartorius muscle runs diagonally down the front of the thigh, connecting from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) at the upper front of the pelvis to the inside of the tibia, the primary shin bone. Strains can occur in this muscle.

Physiotherapy can be beneficial in the management of Sartorius muscle strains. It may involve providing guidance, performing massage, utilising ultrasound therapy, applying taping techniques, and prescribing specific exercises to aid in the restoration of muscular strength and flexibility.

Femoral Nerve Pain

The femoral nerve, which runs down the front of the thigh, is derived from the nerve roots of the lumbar spine. Compression of this nerve can occur at various points along its path, including tight muscles it passes through or the point where it exits the lumbar spine. Additionally, direct damage to the nerve, such as from a pelvic fracture, or prolonged pressure on the nerve can lead to symptoms. These symptoms may include pain along the front of the leg, numbness or tingling in the thigh, a sense of weakness in the leg and knee, and a feeling that the leg might give way.

Physiotherapy can play a role in the management of femoral nerve compression by addressing any contributing structures that may be affecting the nerve and by providing exercises for nerve gliding to help alleviate symptoms and improve function.

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

It’s more common in boys between the ages of 12 and 15 and can result in inner knee pain. Being overweight is considered one of the risk factors for Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis. This condition involves the growth plate at the top of the thigh bone (femur) slipping over the femur, either suddenly or gradually.

Perthes Disease

It usually affects boys between the ages of 4 and 10 and involves bone disintegration over the femoral head or the top of the thigh bone. Common symptoms include a limp, pain in the knee, groin, and thigh, as well as restricted and stiff hip movement.

Physiotherapy can be beneficial in managing this condition by providing appropriate exercises and guidance to help improve hip mobility and function.

Referred Pain

Pain radiating down the outside of the leg can originate from issues with the hip, back, or pelvis. Additionally, trigger points in other muscles can refer pain to the front of the thigh.

Pain on the outside of the thigh can actually be caused by a problem in another joint such as the hip, back and pelvis. Trigger points in muscles which are not on the front of the thigh can also refer pain there.

Stress Fracture of the Femur

Stress fractures of the thigh bone can occur due to overuse, leading to a deep, dull aching pain that worsens when pressure is applied, such as when the leg hangs over the edge of the bed. If a stress fracture is suspected, immediate medical referral is necessary.

Physiotherapy can be beneficial in the recovery process after the stress fracture has healed. It can help restore movement, strength, and function in the injured leg while also maintaining strength in other parts of the body.

Chronic Pain

Chronic pain is a long-lasting condition that often lacks a direct connection to the original injury. It can result from chemical changes in the brain and spinal cord, which lead to the perception of pain in response to various stimuli. Managing chronic pain is a multifaceted approach that goes beyond simply addressing the pain itself.

Physiotherapy for chronic pain involves setting goals, developing graduated exercise plans, and offering guidance on managing pain flare-ups and maintaining a positive outlook. The ultimate aim is to help individuals return to their previous level of engagement in work, sports, and recreational activities despite living with chronic pain. Additionally, we can facilitate access to a leading pain consultant in London to provide specialised care and support.

Other Possible Cause

Before conducting a thorough physical examination, the physiotherapist will gather a detailed history of your symptoms and past medical conditions. It’s important to note that some symptoms may have underlying causes that extend beyond the scope of physiotherapy. In such cases, the physiotherapist may refer you to your general practitioner (GP) or recommend consultation with a specialised physician or consultant. Potential underlying reasons for your symptoms that may warrant medical evaluation include:

  • Cardiovascular Symptoms
  • Respiratory (Breathing) Symptoms
  • Gynaecological Symptoms
  • Urinary Or Genital Symptoms
  • Digestive Symptoms
  • Immune System Symptoms
  • Lymph System Symptoms
  • Hormonal Symptoms
  • Neurological Symptoms
  • Dermatological (Skin) Symptoms
  • Medication Side-Effects
  • Virus
  • Infection
  • Cancer
  • Disease Process
  • Psychological Problems i.e. Depression, Anxiety

Iliotibial Band Syndrome

A significant band of connective tissue known as the iliotibial band runs along the outside of the thigh, connecting the pelvic and gluteal muscles at the top and the outside of the knee at the bottom. Pain can develop in the primary iliotibial band or the region where it attaches to the knee when the knee undergoes repetitive bending and straightening.

There can be various reasons for the iliotibial band to become painful, and a physiotherapist can identify these contributing factors through a comprehensive assessment. The issue can be effectively addressed with specific exercises that your physiotherapist can instruct you on. Additionally, they can provide treatments such as myofascial release and acupuncture to alleviate discomfort in the iliotibial band and the associated gluteal muscles.

Meralgia Paraesthetica

The skin on the outside of the thigh receives its nerve supply from the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh. If this nerve is injured or compressed, it can lead to pain, tingling sensations, or numbness along the outer thigh. Another nerve that passes across the front of the hip can also be susceptible to injury from various factors like trauma, obesity, or seat belt use, resulting in pain that may feel searing and can be aggravated by heat.

Physiotherapy can be beneficial by providing guidance on anti-inflammatory treatments and strategies to avoid situations that might compress the nerve. If physiotherapy does not provide relief, we can recommend a specialist in London who can conduct further tests to determine the precise cause of your symptoms and offer advice on alternative treatments.

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

This is a condition related to the femur that can lead to inner knee pain. It is more commonly experienced by boys between the ages of 12 and 15, and being overweight may be a contributing factor. The growth plate of the femur can either suddenly or gradually shift, which can result in this condition.

Perthes Disease

This condition, characterised by bone deterioration over the femoral head (the top of the thigh bone), is more commonly seen in boys between the ages of 4 and 10. Typical symptoms include a limp and pain in the knee, groin, and thigh, along with restricted and stiff hip movement.

Physiotherapy can be helpful by providing appropriate exercises and guidance to manage and address these symptoms.

Referred Pain

Pain radiating down the outside of the leg can often be attributed to various factors, typically involving issues with the hip, back, or pelvis. Additionally, trigger points in specific muscles can contribute to this discomfort. To effectively address this pain and determine its precise origin, it is crucial to undergo a full assessment conducted by a physiotherapist or healthcare provider. This assessment will help pinpoint the source of the pain, enabling the application of appropriate and targeted treatment methods.

Stress Fracture of the Femur

Excessive or repetitive use of the leg can lead to the development of a stress fracture in the thigh bone. This condition typically presents as a deep, dull ache that intensifies when pressure is applied, such as when the leg hangs over the edge of a bed. If you suspect or are diagnosed with a stress fracture, it’s important to seek immediate medical attention.

Once the stress fracture has healed, physiotherapy can play a crucial role in the recovery process. Physiotherapists can assist in restoring movement, strength, and functionality in the injured leg, while also helping to maintain strength and mobility in other parts of the body. This comprehensive approach ensures a more complete and effective rehabilitation process.

Chronic Pain

Acute pain is the pain we feel immediately after injuring ourselves and while the injury is healing. Chronic pain is pain that continues even though healing has occurred, and it is not unusual to find no direct link between the pain and the original injury that may have healed a long time ago. Chemical changes happen in the brain and spinal cord to re-route signals to pain centres in the brain. Then any normal sensation such as a movement, touch, pressure, stretching etc can be felt as pain. In some instances, the pain system can be activated without any physical stimulus i.e., changes in weather, mood, thoughts, or no stimulus at all.

Physiotherapy for chronic pain must involve many aspects and address other factors that come into play rather than just the pain itself. They will treat the pain and use methods to help you manage your pain including advice on pacing and coping with flare ups and negative thoughts, graduated exercise programmes and goal setting. They will aim to return to you being able to participate again in activities you were involved in before developing chronic pain whether work, sport of hobby related. We can also recommend a top London pain consultant who can help you.

Other Possible Causes

Before commencing a thorough physical assessment, the physiotherapist will diligently gather a comprehensive medical history of your symptoms and prior medical conditions. It’s essential to recognise that your symptoms may stem from a range of underlying causes, some of which extend beyond the scope of physiotherapy and necessitate medical evaluation or consultation with a specialised physician or consultant. In such instances, the physiotherapist will take the responsible step of referring you to your general practitioner (GP) or an appropriate specialist. Here are some potential reasons for such referrals:

  • Cardiovascular Symptoms
  • Respiratory (Breathing) Symptoms
  • Gynaecological Symptoms
  • Urinary Or Genital Symptoms
  • Digestive Symptoms
  • Immune System Symptoms
  • Lymph System Symptoms
  • Hormonal Symptoms
  • Neurological Symptoms
  • Dermatological (Skin) Symptoms
  • Medication Side-Effects
  • Virus
  • Infection
  • Cancer
  • Disease Process
  • Psychological Problems i.e. Depression, Anxiety

Adductor Muscle Strain

The inner thigh muscles, collectively known as the adductors, play a crucial role in drawing your thighs together. Among these muscles are the adductor magnus, adductor longus, and adductor brevis. Strains can affect these adductor muscles to varying degrees of severity, encompassing all three:

  • Grade I Strain: In a grade I strain, only a small portion of the muscle fibres are affected, resulting in localised discomfort.
  • Grade II Strain: A grade II strain involves a larger number of torn muscle fibres, leading to pain, swelling, reduced strength, and potential limitations in movement.
  • Grade III Strain: The most severe, grade III strain signifies a complete tear of the muscle.

Physiotherapy offers a range of effective treatments for adductor muscle strains, including advice, ice therapy, massage, soft tissue techniques, stretching exercises, back work, ultrasound, and taping. Physiotherapists can also devise tailored exercise programs aimed at enhancing muscular strength, flexibility, and overall core stability around the pelvic region.

Gracilis strain

The gracilis muscle, a slender band of muscle that courses along the inner thigh, goes by this delicate name for good reason. When it encounters injury, its recovery journey mirrors that of the adductor muscles, with grading to determine the extent of the strain.

Physiotherapy offers a comprehensive array of beneficial treatments, including counsel, cold therapy, therapeutic massage, soft tissue techniques, targeted stretches, back-focused exercises, ultrasonic therapy, and strategic taping. Through these interventions, physiotherapists work their magic, systematically restoring muscle strength and flexibility with tailored exercises.

Obturator Nerve Injury

The obturator nerve can face potential harm or compromise as it navigates through certain anatomical structures. When this nerve is affected, it can lead to weakness in the adductor muscles, responsible for drawing your thighs together, and subsequently result in inner thigh pain.

Sartorius muscle strain

The Sartorius muscle, a slender and elongated muscle, extends its reach down and across the front of the thigh, connecting to the inner side of the tibia (the primary shin bone) and attaching to the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) at the upper front of the pelvis. When this muscle experiences strain, particularly in the lower region near the knee, it can result in discomfort within the inner thigh.

Physiotherapy plays a pivotal role in aiding recovery through the provision of guidance, therapeutic massage, ultrasound therapy, taping, and personalised exercise regimens. These interventions collectively work to rebuild muscular strength and enhance flexibility.

Femoral Nerve Pain

The femoral nerve, originating from nerve roots in the lumbar spine, courses its way down the front of the thigh. Nerve compression can arise due to constriction within any muscle along its path or at the point where it exits the lumbar spine. Prolonged pressure on the nerve can also lead to physical damage or the onset of symptoms. These symptoms may manifest as pain along the front of the leg, tingling or numbness in the thigh, a sensation of weakness in the leg and knee, and a feeling of instability that it might give way.

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

This is a condition concerning the femur that can lead to inner knee discomfort. It’s more commonly observed in boys aged 12 to 15, and excess weight might contribute to its occurrence. The growth plate may shift abruptly or gradually along the femur in this condition.

Perthes Disease

This condition primarily impacts boys aged 4 to 10 and involves the deterioration of bone over the femoral head, which is the top part of the thigh bone. Typical symptoms include a noticeable limp and pain in the knee, groin, and thigh. In certain areas, there may be restrictions in hip mobility, accompanied by stiffness.

Physiotherapy can offer valuable assistance by providing tailored exercises and expert guidance to address these symptoms effectively.

Referred Pain

Pain originating from the inner thigh can, in fact, stem from issues with adjacent joints such as the hip, back, or pelvis. Furthermore, discomfort in the thigh may be referred from trigger points located in muscles that are not situated on the outer surface.

Chronic Pain

The pain we feel immediately after an injury and during the healing process is termed acute pain. On the other hand, chronic pain persists even after the healing process is complete, often with no clear connection to the original injury. This type of pain can result from chemical changes in the brain and spinal cord that reroute pain signals. Consequently, pain can be triggered by typical sensations like movement, touch, pressure, or stretching, and sometimes even non-physical factors such as changes in weather, mood, thoughts, or without any external stimulus.

In the treatment of chronic pain, physiotherapy addresses not only the pain itself but also a range of associated issues. Physiotherapists aim to provide pain relief and help you manage chronic pain through goal setting, gradual exercise plans, and guidance on handling flare-ups and negative attitudes. Our target is to empower you to return to your previous level of participation in work, sports, and leisure activities as you did before experiencing chronic pain. Additionally, we can recommend reputable pain consultants in London who can offer further assistance.

Other Possible Cause

Prior to conducting a thorough physical examination, the physiotherapist will first gather a comprehensive history of your symptoms and medical background. It’s important to note that, apart from physiotherapy treatment, there are several other potential causes of your symptoms that a physiotherapist may not be qualified to address. In such cases, they will refer you to your general practitioner (GP) or an appropriate specialist or consultant. Some of these potential underlying reasons include:

  • Cardiovascular Symptoms
  • Respiratory (Breathing) Symptoms
  • Gynaecological Symptoms
  • Urinary Or Genital Symptoms
  • Digestive Symptoms
  • Immune System Symptoms
  • Lymph System Symptoms
  • Hormonal Symptoms
  • Neurological Symptoms
  • Dermatological (Skin) Symptoms
  • Medication Side-Effects
  • Virus
  • Infection
  • Cancer
  • Disease Process
  • Psychological Problem i.e. Depression, Anxiety

Hamstring Strain

Located at the back of the thigh, the hamstring muscle comprises three distinct parts: the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus. These three components can all be susceptible to varying degrees of strain, depending on their severity. In a grade I strain, only a small portion of muscle fibres is affected, resulting in localised discomfort. A grade II strain involves pain, swelling, reduced strength, and potential restrictions in movement due to a larger number of fibres being torn. A grade III strain indicates a complete tear of the muscle.

Physiotherapy offers a range of beneficial treatments, including advice, cold therapy, therapeutic massage, soft tissue techniques, targeted stretching, back-focused exercises, ultrasound therapy, and taping. Alongside these interventions, specific exercises can be performed to enhance muscle strength and flexibility, facilitating a return to sporting activities.

Sciatic Nerve Pain

The sciatic nerve originates in the lower back and extends down the back of the leg, and it can be a source of pain, typically characterised as deep and dull. A physiotherapist can conduct specialised tests to ascertain if the sciatic nerve is indeed the root cause of this pain.

Physiotherapy can offer valuable assistance by focusing on the lower back, enhancing the nerve’s mobility, and addressing any surrounding tissues that may be compressing or constraining the nerve.

Referred Pain

While the origin of discomfort may lie elsewhere, it can manifest along the back of the leg. Trigger points in the gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and piriformis muscles are known culprits that can cause this pain. Pain in the back of the thigh can also be attributed to various structures in the lumbar spine, including the disc, facet joint, muscles, and ligaments. Additionally, conditions such as spondylosis and lumbar spondylolisthesis can bring about back thigh pain. Furthermore, compression at the point where nerves exit the lower back can contribute to this type of discomfort. Symptoms of referred pain often develop gradually and may include a sensation of tightness in the affected area. Interestingly, activities like walking and jogging are often pain-free, and the symptoms are typically less severe than those experienced during hamstring muscle stretching.

Physiotherapy plays a crucial role by conducting a comprehensive assessment to identify the source of your thigh pain. Following this evaluation, the physiotherapist can effectively address the issue.

Upper Hamstring Tendinopathy

The hamstring tendon, connecting the upper part of the hamstring muscle to the bone beneath the pelvis, can indeed become painful. This discomfort is often associated with frequent sprinting and tends to worsen just before and after exercise.

Physiotherapy can be of help through techniques such as taping, soft tissue methods, and the implementation of a structured rehabilitation exercise program.

Ischial Bursitis

A bursa, a small sac filled with fluid, is positioned between the hamstring tendon and the ischium bone. Many individuals experience discomfort, especially when sitting on firm surfaces that exert pressure on this bursa, potentially leading to inflammation.

To alleviate this irritation, cortisone injections are often required as a treatment option. We can recommend a well-known specialist in London who is qualified to perform this procedure.

Lower Hamstring Tendinopathy

Pain is often experienced at the point where the hamstring tendon connects to the knee, typically at the lower end of the back of the thigh. This discomfort tends to worsen before or after physical activity, particularly in sports that involve frequent knee bending, like sprinting.

Physiotherapy offers a range of services to address this issue, including advice, cold therapy, soft tissue techniques, taping, acupuncture, and the development of appropriate rehabilitation exercises to alleviate pain and promote healing.

Adductor Magnus Strain

The muscle responsible for pulling the leg inward, situated in the inner thigh, can sometimes cause confusion by mimicking the symptoms of a hamstring injury when strained. Regarding hamstring strains, they are categorised into three distinct grades based on their severity.

Physiotherapy plays a vital role in distinguishing between a hamstring and adductor muscle strain through specific assessments. Once identified, physiotherapists can provide guidance, cold therapy, soft tissue treatments, taping, ultrasound therapy, and tailored stretching exercises. Additionally, they can recommend exercises to enhance muscle flexibility and strength.

Compartment Syndrome

The body consists of various compartments, and the sciatic nerve and hamstring muscles reside in the compartment at the rear of the thigh. Compartment syndrome, characterised by increased pressure within this compartment leading to reduced blood supply to the muscles, can result in pain. During exercise, the muscles attempt to expand, but they are constrained in doing so. This condition is more likely to affect individuals with a history of hamstring injuries and endurance athletes. Common symptoms include a sensation of tightness in the limb and a persistent, dull pain. Weakness and muscle cramps at the back of the leg can also occur, both before and after exercise.

If you suspect that compartment syndrome may be causing your pain, physiotherapy can provide assistance. However, a physician’s referral will be necessary for proper evaluation. We can recommend a reputable consultant in London who can assess whether this condition is indeed the source of your symptoms.

Avulsion of the Hamstring

When the upper tendon of the hamstring forcefully detaches from its attachment point on the bone, it can result in sudden and excruciating pain. This type of injury is often associated with activities like powerlifting and water skiing.

In this urgent situation, it is imperative to seek a medical referral. We can recommend a well-respected consultant in London who can conduct a thorough examination to determine the extent of the injury and provide appropriate treatment.

Vascular Pain

The external iliac artery, which typically runs along the outside and front of the thigh, can be an unexpected source of pain in the back of the thigh when it’s injured. This type of pain is often linked to activities like cycling and tends to manifest during exercise, subsiding when the person stops.

If you suspect that this arterial issue might be causing your pain, a physiotherapy evaluation can help determine its likelihood. Should it appear to be the source, you will require a medical referral, and we can connect you with an expert in London for further assessment and guidance.

Stress Fracture of the Femur

Overuse can lead to a stress fracture of the thigh bone, characterised by a deep, persistent ache that intensifies when pressure is applied, such as when the leg hangs over the edge of the bed. If you suspect such a fracture, it’s crucial to seek immediate medical attention, and we can assist you in connecting with a respected expert in London for evaluation and care.

Once the stress fracture has healed, physiotherapy becomes valuable in restoring mobility, strength, and function to the injured leg, as well as maintaining overall strength in other parts of the body.

Chronic Pain

The immediate and healing phase pain following an injury is referred to as acute pain. On the other hand, chronic pain persists even after the injury has healed, often with no apparent connection to the original injury. This type of pain involves chemical changes in the brain and spinal cord that reroute pain signals, making pain perception possible in response to various sensations, including movement, touch, pressure, and stretching. Interestingly, changes in weather, mood, thoughts, or even the absence of any physical stimulus can sometimes trigger the pain system.

Physiotherapy for chronic pain encompasses not only the treatment of pain itself but also addresses a range of associated issues. In addition to providing pain relief, physiotherapists assist in pain management by setting goals, devising gradual exercise plans, and offering guidance on coping with flare-ups and negative attitudes. The ultimate objective is to empower individuals to regain their previous level of engagement in work, sports, and leisure activities as they did before the onset of chronic pain. Furthermore, we can connect you with leading pain experts in London who can provide specialised assistance.

Other Possible Cause

Before proceeding with a full physical examination, the physiotherapist will first gather a detailed history of your symptoms and past medical conditions. It’s important to recognise that aside from physiotherapy treatment, there could be various other underlying causes of your symptoms that a physiotherapist may not be qualified to address, or that may necessitate medical advice in addition to physiotherapy. In such cases, they will refer you to your general practitioner (GP) or an appropriate specialist or consultant. Some potential underlying reasons include:

  • Cardiovascular Symptoms
  • Respiratory (Breathing) Symptoms
  • Gynaecological Symptoms
  • Urinary Or Genital Symptoms
  • Digestive Symptoms
  • Immune System Symptoms
  • Lymph System Symptoms
  • Hormonal Symptoms
  • Neurological Symptoms
  • Dermatological (Skin) Symptoms
  • Medication Side-Effects
  • Virus
  • Infection
  • Cancer
  • Disease Process
  • Psychological Problems i.e. Depression, Anxiety

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